STR Profiling for Mouse Cell Lines: A New Tool to Combat Cell Line Misidentification

9/12/2019


Abstract:

Do you trust the results of your experiments? Cell line misidentification and cross contamination have far-reaching impacts in biomedical studies, including publication retraction, credibility loss, data invalidation, and financial cost. While human cell line authentication has been addressed with a short tandem repeat (STR) profiling, up until now there has not been a validated method for identifying mouse cell lines beyond the species level. In this webinar, we will describe ATCC’s STR profiling services, focusing on a new mouse STR profiling method. After the presentation, we invite you to join in on the discussion as a panel of ATCC cell line authentication experts answer your questions.

Key points:

  • Cell line authentication is a critical requirement to receive funding for research, publish papers in scientific journals, and validate in vitro studies for preclinical testing
  • ATCC offers human and mouse STR profiling services for cell line authentication
  • The mouse STR profiling method was developed by NIST in collaboration with ATCC and 10 independent laboratories

Presenters

Balsam Shawky, M.S.

Balsam Shawky, M.S.,
Senior Biologist, ATCC Standards Resource Center

Balsam Shawky, M.S., is a Senior Biologist with extensive experience in cell authentication and molecular biology. At ATCC, she was instrumental in the development of new cell authentication services focused on mycoplasma detection, mouse short tandem repeat profiling, and CO1 species identification. Prior to joining ATCC, Ms. Shawky was a Genotyping Project Manager at LGC Standards where she developed and managed multiple high-throughput molecular-based assays. Ms. Shawky earned her master’s degree from King’s College London in the United Kingdom.

Brian Shapiro

Brian Shapiro, Ph.D.,
Scientific Content Specialist, ATCC

Brian A Shapiro, Ph.D., works to communicate the scientific breakthroughs of ATCC’s product development laboratories to the biomedical research community. Previously, he worked at Virginia Commonwealth University, where he investigated the role of pre-mRNA splicing in the multi-drug resistance of lung cancer. Dr. Shapiro attended the Medical College of Georgia, where his research focused on adrenal physiology as well as diseases of the epidermis.