Vero-SF-ACF (ATCC® CCL-81.5)

Organism: Cercopithecus aethiops  / 

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Organism Cercopithecus aethiops
Product Format frozen
Morphology epithelial
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Age adult
Applications
detection of verotoxin
efficacy testing
malaria biology
media testing
mycoplasma testing
substrate
testing
transfection host
detection of virus in ground beef
Storage Conditions liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Karyotype This is a cell line with the hypodiploid chromosome count. The modal chromosome number was 58 occurring in 66% of cells. In most cells, over 50% of the chromosomes in each cell complement belonged to structurally altered marker chromosomes. Normal A3, A4, B4, and B5 were absent; B2, B3 and B7 were occasionally paired; and B9, C1 and C5 were mostly paired. The rate of cells with higher ploidies was 1.7%. Other chromosomes were mostly present in single copy.
Derivation The parental Vero cell line was initiated from the kidney of a normal adult African green monkey on March 27, 1962, by Y. Yasumura and Y. Kawakita at the Chiba University in Chiba, Japan
Comments

Vero-SF-ACF cell line was derived from the parental Vero cell line (ATCC CCL-81) by adaptation to serum-free and animal component-free medium. 

The parental Vero cell line has been shown to be susceptible to infection by: poliovirus 1, 2, 3; Getah; Ndumu; Pixuna; Ross River; Semliki Forest; Paramaribo; Kokobera; Modoc; Murutucu; Germiston; Guaroa; Pongola; Tacaribe; SV-5; SV40; rubeola; rubellavirus; reovirus 1, 2, 3; and simian adenoviruses.
The parental Vero cell line has been show to be resistant to infection by the following viruses: Stratford; Apeu; Caraparu; Madrid; Nepuyo; Ossa

Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is VeroPlus SFM (ATCC Catalog No. ACS-4001). To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: 4mM L-glutamine (final conc.). This medium is formulated for use with a 5% CO2 in air atmosphere.
Subculturing

Volumes used in this protocol are for a 75 cm2 flask; proportionally reduce or increase amount of dissociation medium for culture vessels of other sizes.

  1. Remove and discard culture medium.
  2. Briefly rinse the cell layer with Ca++/Mg++ free Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (D-PBS).
  3. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of 0.25% (w/v) Trypsin-0.53mM EDTA solution to flask and observe cells under an inverted microscope until cell layer is dispersed (usually within 5 to 15 minutes).
    Note: To avoid clumping do not agitate the cells by tapping or shaking the flask while waiting for the cells to detach. Cells that are difficult to detach may be placed at 37°C to facilitate dispersal.
  4. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of 0.25% Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor and aspirate cells by gently pipetting.
  5. Transfer cell suspension to a centrifuge tube and spin at approximately 125 x g for 5 to 10 minutes.
  6. Discard supernatant and resuspend cells in fresh growth medium. Add appropriate aliquots of cell suspension to new culture vessels.
  7. Incubate cultures at 37°C
Note:
  1. Cells grow best after the first subculture.
  2. For more information on enzymatic dissociation and subculturing of cell lines consult Chapter 13 in Culture Of Animal Cells: A Manual Of Basic Technique by R. Ian Freshney, 6th edition, published by Wiley-Liss, N.Y., 2010.

Subcultivation Ratio: 1.3 to 1:6

Medium Renewal: One to two times weekly
Cryopreservation
Freeze medium: 

Serum-Free Cell Freezing Medium (ATCC 30-2600)

Storage temperature: liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Culture Conditions
Atmosphere: air, 95%; carbon dioxide (CO2), 5%
Temperature: 37.0°C
Name of Depositor ATCC
Year of Origin 2011
References

Yasumura Y, Kawakita Y. Studies on SV40 in tissue culture - preliminary step for cancer research in vitro. Nihon Rinsho 21: 1201-1215, 1963.

Simizu B, et al. Characterization of the Tacaribe group of arboviruses. I. Propagation and plaque assay of Tacaribe virus in a line of African green monkey kidney cells (Vero). Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 125: 119-123, 1967. PubMed: 6027511

Rhim JS, Schell K. Cytopathic and plaque assay of rubella virus in a line of African green monkey kiency cells (Vero). Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 125: 602-606, 1967. PubMed: 4961492

Rhim JS, et al. Temperature dependence of the synthesis of adenovirus tumor and viral antigens. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 127: 642-646, 1968. PubMed: 5689485

Rhim JS, Schell K. Cytopathic effects of the parainfluenza virus SV5 in Vero cells. Nature 216: 271-272, 1967. PubMed: 4293683

Rhim JS, et al. Growth of Junin virus, the etiological agent of Argentinian hemorrhagic fever, in cell cultures. Arch. Gesamte Virusforsch. 21: 243-252, 1967. PubMed: 5591575

Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories 4th ed.; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ;1999.

Notice: Necessary PermitsPermits

These permits may be required for shipping this product:

  • Customers located in the state of Hawaii will need to contact the Hawaii Department of Agriculture to determine if an Import Permit is required. A copy of the permit or documentation that a permit is not required must be sent to ATCC in advance of shipment.
Basic Documentation
References

Yasumura Y, Kawakita Y. Studies on SV40 in tissue culture - preliminary step for cancer research in vitro. Nihon Rinsho 21: 1201-1215, 1963.

Simizu B, et al. Characterization of the Tacaribe group of arboviruses. I. Propagation and plaque assay of Tacaribe virus in a line of African green monkey kidney cells (Vero). Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 125: 119-123, 1967. PubMed: 6027511

Rhim JS, Schell K. Cytopathic and plaque assay of rubella virus in a line of African green monkey kiency cells (Vero). Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 125: 602-606, 1967. PubMed: 4961492

Rhim JS, et al. Temperature dependence of the synthesis of adenovirus tumor and viral antigens. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 127: 642-646, 1968. PubMed: 5689485

Rhim JS, Schell K. Cytopathic effects of the parainfluenza virus SV5 in Vero cells. Nature 216: 271-272, 1967. PubMed: 4293683

Rhim JS, et al. Growth of Junin virus, the etiological agent of Argentinian hemorrhagic fever, in cell cultures. Arch. Gesamte Virusforsch. 21: 243-252, 1967. PubMed: 5591575

Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories 4th ed.; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ;1999.