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Expand Your Cell-based Assays With an Unlimited, Biologically Relevant Resource

Yalin Firinci, M.B.A., is adept at developing next generation biological models that incorporate primary cells. Join this webinar to hear this ATCC expert cover the following key points:

  • Differentiated iPSCs lend the ability to run large toxicity studies and drug screens on highly biologically relevant cells.
  • ATCC iPSCs were used as the source for three types of differentiated cells: CD34+ progenitors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and monocytes.
  • ATCC R&D scientists have generated in-depth data showing the iPSC-derived cells can be incorporated into immunoassays and further differentiated into cell types such as osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes.

Dr. James Clinton is an expert at developing advanced cell biology models for the scientific community. Watch his presentation to gain an overview of the Human Cancer Models Initiative (HCMI), and of the technologies driving the development of these “next-generation” models that hold promise to transform in vitro cancer research.

  • There is an unmet need for novel preclinical cancer models that better reflect the genotype and phenotype across the spectrum of cancer found in the patient population.
  • The HCMI is funded by the National Cancer Institute, Cancer Research UK, Wellcome Sanger Institute, and the foundation Hubrecht Organoid Technology, and seeks to generate 1000 novel cancer models that will be manufactured and distributed by ATCC.
  • A wide variety of patient-derived in vitro cancer models are offered, including 3D organoids and neurospheres, as well as conditionally reprogrammed cells and other 2D models.

Dr. Elizabeth Gillies is well-versed in using CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing technology for creating cell-based models with disease-relevant mutations. Watch the presentation to learn how this advanced technology was used to introduce a specific point mutation that confers drug resistance into the A375 melanoma line. Dr. Gillies will present data indicating that this isogenic cell line is resistant to both MEK and BRAF inhibitors and sensitive to combination therapies targeting both upstream and downstream elements of the Ras/Raf-MAPK signaling pathway.

Key Points:

  • CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering was used to create a series of isogenic cell-based models of drug-resistant melanoma.
  • The new A375 MEK1 Q56P melanoma model is resistant to BRAF and MEK inhibitors currently used in melanoma treatment, making it an ideal model for the development of novel therapeutics and combination therapies.
  • A375 drug-resistant melanoma models can be used for screening or study of novel therapeutics in either the traditional 2D tissue culture format or as 3D spheroids that more closely mimic the biological tumor micro-environment.

Luis Rodriguez, Ph.D., and Kevin Grady, B.S., are adept at developing cell-based assays that incorporate immortalized primary cells. Join this webinar to hear Dr. Rodriguez and Mr. Grady cover these topics:

  • hTERT-immortalized primary cells are comparable to primary cells regarding physiological relevance, but without the limitation of proliferation.
  • Using well-characterized hTERT-immortalized cells, ATCC has created credible cell models for toxicological studies on the kidney, skin, airway, and vasculature.
  • Our data show that these modified cell lines are effective tools that provide tissue-relevant results and reproducibility for any cell-based assay, including toxicology assays.

Building a Zika virus vaccine

From global health to virus–like particle technology

2/14/2019

Velasco Cimica, Ph.D., is an expert in vaccine development using virus-like particles for developing vaccine candidates for emerging viruses. Join this webinar to hear Dr. Cimica cover the following key points:

  • We have developed a chimeric Zika-VLP–based vaccine that elicits a protective immune response and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) and Guillian Barré Syndrome (GBS) in murine animal models. 
  • Zika-VLPs containing the CD loop sub-structural domain from envelope protein domain III induced a strong antibody response against the Zika virus in mouse models after prime immunization. 
  • The protective immunity of our novel Zika-VLP vaccine candidates is mediated by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

Neural Progenitor Cells

Better Biological Models of Neurodegenerative Disease

12/6/2018

Scientists are challenged by the lack of advanced biological models of the nervous system to produce meaningful results that lead to better, more precise treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. As part of our pledge to provide validated models to better recapitulate in vivo systems, ATCC has created neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from normal and Parkinson’s disease-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. NPCs are ideal in vitro models as they can be induced to differentiate down all three neural lineages. In this webinar we will focus on the Parkinson’s disease-derived NPCs, detailing their neural biomarker expression profiles during dopaminergic neuron differentiation and validating their use in toxicological studies.

EMT Reporter Cell Lines

New Tools for Metastasis Studies

11/15/2018

Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) describes a cellular process during which differentiated epithelial cells lose their epithelial features and gain mesenchymal properties. EMT has been implicated in the invasion-metastasis cascade hallmark of cancer; cells undergoing EMT display an ability to promote metastasis and elevated drug resistance. Therefore, an in vitro

EMT reporter cell model is a valuable tool for dissecting EMT molecular pathways and screening therapeutic compounds. ATCC recently created novel EMT reporter knock-in cell lines by using CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing technology. These EMT reporter cells faithfully recapitulate the endogenous EMT marker expression; in response to treatment, the reporter cells undergo EMT, enabling real-time monitoring of dynamic EMT intermediate states in live cells. Further, we present application data indicating that pathway- specific inhibitors can block EMT in a dose-dependent manner.

Physiological relevance or ease of use?

Enjoy both with hTERT-immortalized Primary Cells

10/18/2018

Two challenges that scientists experience when developing a cell-based assay include obtaining cells with biological relevance and then producing or procuring enough cells to run the assay without introducing cell variability. hTERT-immortalized primary cells address both issues. These cells are genetically modified such that the cells exhibit the growth characteristics of a continuous cell line but maintain the physiology of a primary cell. In this webinar, ATCC scientists will discuss our broad portfolio of hTERT-immortalized primary cells and provide some application data to illustrate how these cell models can easily be incorporated into your workflow.

Abstract:

Throughout the world, acute respiratory infections are responsible for millions of deaths annually and are a leading cause of mortality in children. Even if not fatal, these infections can be debilitating and often result in hospitalization. Viruses such as influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and enterovirus are major contributors to this disease burden. Emerging viruses have also posed significant risks to human health, as demonstrated by the SARS coronavirus outbreak in 2003 and the recent emergence of the MERS coronavirus. This underscores the importance of effective respiratory virus diagnostic assays, vaccines, and antiviral therapies. In this presentation, we will summarize the impact of respiratory viral disease on global health initiatives; the latest efforts to control and prevent infections (e.g., the universal influenza vaccine); and the importance of authenticated viruses and derivatives in the development of diagnostic assays, vaccines, and antiviral therapeutics.

Key Points:

  • Endemic and emerging respiratory virus infections represent a significant global heath burden.
  • Understanding respiratory virus epidemiology and pathogenesis is critical for the development of antiviral therapies.
  • Authenticated viral standards and derivatives are essential tools for the development and validation of novel preventative and therapeutic techniques.

CRISPR/Cas9 genome-editing technology is a powerful new tool for developing cell-based models with disease-relevant mutations. In this presentation, we describe how this advanced technology was used to introduce specific point mutation that confers drug resistance into the A375 melanoma line to create the MEK1 Q56P Mutant-A375 Isogenic Cell Line. The new isogenic cell line is resistant to both MEK and BRAF inhibitors and, like the current isogenic KRAS and NRAS Mutant-A375 Cell Lines, sensitive to combination therapies targeting both upstream and downstream elements of the Ras/Raf-MAPK signaling pathway, making it an ideal model for screening and evaluating novel therapeutics and combination treatments targeting multidrug-resistant melanomas.